How 3D printing is changing the way we live

Atmel | Bits & Pieces

Writing for the Wall Street JournalJavier Espinoza compiled a list of the various ways that 3D printing will assimilate itself into every possible aspect of your daily life; in fact, the technology is already being implemented into art and fashion, travel, food, and even automotive industries.

Much like our recent post about 3D-printed ice cream, the WSJ highlighted the countertop 3D food printer, the Foodini. Perhaps we’ll be replacing our microwaves with 3D printers sooner than we think. As strange as it may sound, the unit has the ability to complete tasks such as taking a substance, like dough, and forming it into a programmed pretzel shape. Looking to satisfy your sweet tooth? The device can even process highly intricate cookie or frosting designs to include a high-tech element to your favorite baked goods.

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The Journal also detailed the fact that some manufacturers are already using 3D printing to create scale…

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Puppy gets new set of wheels thanks to 3D printing

Atmel | Bits & Pieces

What happens when you take an adorable dog, 3D printing and the kindness of strangers throughout the Maker community? As 3D printing continues its rise in popularity, the technology has already found its way into nearly every facet of life. From 3D-printed ice cream and houses to bionic hands and splints, the next-gen printers are proving their mainstream value by saving lives of both humans and our furry friends.

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TurboRoo is a Chihuahua that was born with a birth defects that caused his two front legs never to grow. While a baby, TurboRoo’s owners created a makeshift set of wheels from an assortment of children’s toys together. Knowing that their pet required a permanent solution, they began seeking $600 in funds online to get this friendly canine into a wheelchair.

Mark Deadrick, President of 3dyn, came across TurboRoo’s touching story online. Given the distance between the two (Deadrick lives in San Diego while TurboRoo in Indianapolis), the design company…

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3D printing your own virtual reality headset

Atmel | Bits & Pieces

It is without question that Oculus Rift has become the gold standard of the VR headset market; however, for those where a Rift headset is a bit out of reach, you can always devise your own in true Maker fashion. Noa Ruiz over at Adafruit has published a complete tutorial detailing how to do just that — create your own virtual reality headset with the help of some 3D printing and old-fashioned ingenuity.

DIY-VR-headset

To complement an instructional video, Ruiz’s comprehensive guide features a full materials list as well as an extensive breakdown of each step throughout the development process. “In this project we’re building a wearable HD monitor. This is great for anyone looking to make their own a personal display,” the Maker wrote in his introduction.

The design of the DIY VR headset is similar to that of the VR2GO mobile viewer, including a 5.6″ display. The main components of the headset consist of a four-piece design that “keeps secured with…

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Meet the Maker: thethirddimensionpopup

2016 Sydney Mini Maker Faire

XYZ Workshop_digital safari._rhino_col Digital Safari by XYZ Workshop (Courtesy of thethirddimensionpopup)

thethirddimensionpopup is an opportunity to learn about the exciting world of 3D printing! See, touch and buy 3D printed designs by leading Australian and international designers. Every product in our stall is 3D printed and made from a range of materials including plastics, nylon, bronze, stainless steel, sterling silver and ceramics.

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Test Prints

Mystic Settlement Art Project Research Log

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this one is the first half of my attempt at a free standing figure. the body still needs alot of work fixing preportions – it may need to be rebuilt from scratch again. the base will probably need to be redesigned or the approach to milling it seriously planned out because the long vertical drops risk tool breakage, the shoes came out a lot more defined than the last attempt, the posture would be better were it leaning back slightly from the waist up, but as i wish to keep the eyeholes flush with the tool so there are no irregularities it will require either a serious redesign of the base, or the head modeled as a separate plug.

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CEHPL Printing Ideas into Reality

Truro C@P

Depicted in popular medical shows as a life-saving futuristic machine and owned by nerdy celebrities like Wil Wheaton, a 3-D printer is not one of the things you would expect your local library to showcase. Colchester East Hants Public Library (CEHPL) is in the possession of such a 3-D printer, migrating from branch to branch and showcasing its abilities to children and adults alike.

The crash course on 3-D printers: they take 3-D digital images from a computer and print them with plastic, layer by layer, to make an object like a comb or an action figure. To quote everyone who witnesses a 3-D printer print for the first time, “It literally prints 3-D shapes!”

The printer is a MakerBot Replicator 2, and it is small enough to fit comfortably on your desk while you work. Using PLA, a biodegradable plastic filament made with sugar and cornstarch, the printer heats…

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Custom Jewelry for my Girlfriend

After Noah made the ark...

As a graduation present, I wanted to make my girlfriend something special, so I decided to design her a unique ring and print it in silver! I modeled the ring in Autodesk’s 123D Design so that I could try out the software (although after getting Autodesk’s Inventor, I will never use 123D design again.) The whole project took me 5 hours, and I banged it out on a Saturday morning 🙂

First, I sketched out the general design on paper. She really likes horse-back riding, and she has a horse named Kaia. I decided to make the ring say Kaia, and after a few sketches and versions, I finally came up with the concept that drove the ring’s design.

Once I had the concept, I made the typography in 123D Design using Splines. I tweaked the letters until everything looked about right.

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Then, I did various sweeps with 2mm x…

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